Intern Program

The Office of Technology Transfer has a several opportunities for students to intern. Generally these are unpaid volunteer programs designed to provide an introduction to a subset of the daily activities within a technology transfer office. These internships enable students to combine their background with training and experience in areas such as technology valuation, patenting, marketing, and licensing. The training and education received will help prepare interns for alternative careers in areas like technology transfer, business development, economic development, and patent law.

Check out the intern section of our blog site.

Current and Past Interns: First Row: Paul Musille, David Giannantonio, Cliff Michaels, S. Anna Sargsyan Second Row: Sharon Soucek, Lisa Matragrano, Sommer Zimmerman, Dana Fallaize, Lola Olufemi , Yvonne Ogbonmwan, Kimberlynn Davis, Adam Raymond

This track will assist the Licensing Team in its technology commerciailization process. Projects include preparation of non-confidential (tech briefs) summaries, market research, and technology assessments.

Program Goals

  • To provide opportunities for interns to gain exposure to the process of intellectual property management, particularly in a university setting. 
  • To provide opportunities for interns to improve analytical and writing skills.
  • To provide guidance on a potential career in technology transfer.
Candidate Qualifications:
  • Have a minimum of a bachelors degree in a life science, physical sciences and/or engineering
  • Written and verbal fluency in English
  • Must be pursuing or have received an advanced degree in law, science or engineering; and
  • Have an interest in intellectual property as a career goal

Please review our Intern Program Document for more detailed information.

If interested in the licensing track send a resume or CV and a writing sample with cover letter expressing interest to:

Cory Acuff, PhD
cacuff@emory.edu
 
Emory University
Office of Technology Transfer
1599 Clifton Rd, NE, 4th Floor
Atlanta, GA 30322

The internship program will assist the Emory Patent Group (the “EPG”) in its ongoing intellectual property evaluation and patent process procedures. Projects include conducting patent research, assisting in the evaluation of university technologies for patentability, and assisting in the preparation of patent applications and prosecution.

Program Goals

  • To provide opportunities for interns to gain exposure to the process of intellectual property management, particularly in a university setting. 
  • To provide opportunities for interns to improve analytical and writing skills.
  • To provide guidance on a potential career as a registered patent agent or attorney.
Candidate Qualifications:
  • Have a minimum of a bachelors degree in a life science, physical sciences and/or engineering
  • Written and verbal fluency in English
  • Must be pursuing or have received an advanced degree in law, science or engineering; and
  • Have an interest in intellectual property as a career goal

Please review our Intern Program Document for more detailed information.

If interested in the licensing track send a resume or CV with cover letter expressing interest to:

Susanne Hollinger, PhD, JD
shollin@emory.edu
 
Emory University
Office of Technology Transfer
1599 Clifton Rd, NE, 4th Floor
Atlanta, GA 30322

Shawn Alter
Shawn is an intern in the Office of Technology Transfer and a doctoral candidate in the molecular and systems pharmacology program. He is interested in how disruptions in neurotransmission cause neurological disease. Under his advisor Gary Miller, Shawn is studying how impeding the vesicular storage of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin differentially drive behavior and neurodegeneration in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease. Prior to his graduate training, Shawn received his bachelor of arts in biochemistry from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio.

Thomas Kaiser
Tom is currently a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Prof. Dennis Liotta in the Department of Chemistry at Emory. He conducts research into new antiviral nucleosides for the treatment and prevention of dengue hemorrhagic fever. He was an NIH Chemistry-Biology Interface predoctoral Fellow at Texas A&M where he received his post doctural degree in organic synthesis and enantioselective palladium catalysis.

Paul Musille
Paul is a licensing intern and a graduate student in the molecular and systems pharmacology graduate program under the supervision of Eric Ortlund, PhD. His research utilizes macromolecular X-ray crystallography to study lipid regulated transcription and the structure-activity relationships of pharmacologically relevant nuclear receptors. Paul’s research on the orphan nuclear receptor, LRH-1, has helped to elucidate its ligand regulation and species-specific differences for ligand responsiveness. Prior to his doctoral research at Emory, Paul attended Gannon University where he received his bachelor of science in chemistry.

Shirlene Jackson-Bedford
Shirlene was an intern in the office and a graduate student in the chemistry department at Georgia State University. The focus of her research is interactions of small molecules with nucleic acids. Her work involves the application of various biophysical techniques and computational methods to elucidate the molecular recognition patterns and rationalize the driving forces that give rise to the binding affinities and sequence selectivity exhibited by ligands that bind to DNA. Her work has been accepted for publication in JBSD. Shirlene holds a master of science in natural product chemistry and a bachelor of science in chemistry from the University of the West Indies, Jamaica.

Mitsi Blount
Mitsi is an intern and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine and has an adjunct appointment in the Department of Physiology. Her laboratory investigates how second messenger signaling pathways maintain renal function in the face of various maladies including hypertension and diabetes. Prior to joining the faculty, Mitsi was a post-doctoral fellow at Emory University where she focused on the regulation of urea transport in the kidney. Mitsi earned her Ph.D. in Molecular Physiology and Biophysics from Vanderbilt University. Her thesis work investigated the unique binding properties of the various PDE5-inhbitors used to treat erectile dysfunction. She received her bachelor degree in biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Austin Cape
Austin was an intern in the office as well as a freelance medical writer and founding editor of Concepta Science Communications, a writing firm specializing in academic biomedical publications. Austin earned his doctorate from the Human Genetics Department at Emory University studying the molecular mechanisms of insulin trafficking and secretion from pancreatic beta cells. Following graduate school, Austin trained in clinical research at the Emory Genetics Clinic, focusing on clinical trials in nutrition and newborn screening technologies. Austin's career interests are in developing scientific ideas and discoveries into useful applications and products.

Shuang Chang
Shuang was an intern and a registered patent agent with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Her postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Human Genetics at Emory University School of Medicine involved developing a large-scale drug screen for potential pharmaceutical treatment for Fragile X mental retardation. This work was published in Nature Chemical Biology. Shuang received her doctoral from Washington University in St. Louis, where she conducted close collaborated research with Monsanto Company in specialized biotechnology.

Jason Cloward
Jason was a contract research microbiologist at IHRC, Inc. working at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention after completing his postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Emory University. Prior to obtaining his graduate degree, Jason worked for AT&T as a Technical Specialist in enterprise web hosting designing, negotiating, and implementing customer solutions while serving as a liaison between diverse corporate divisions. Eager to return to biotechnology, he joined the University of Georgia graduate program and obtained his post doctorate studying the role of a chaperone protein in the assembly of the attachment complex in Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

Kimberlynn Davis
Kim was an intern within the office while completing her graduate studies in the organic division of the chemistry department at Emory. Her graduate research focused on synthesizing novel nucleoside analogues as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors and also on developing methodology to improve the regioselectivity of nucleoside base couplings. She obtained a bachelor of science in biochemistry from Xavier University in New Orleans, LA. After graduating from Emory, Kim joined the Atlanta office of Fish & Richardson, PC and then transitioned to the patent boutique firm of McKeon, Meunier, Carlin, & Curfman, LLC. Recently, Kim moved to Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton, LLP and is currently attending Georgia State University College of Law.

Dominic DeMichina
Dominic was a second year masters of business administration student at Emory's Goizueta Business School while interning at the Office of Technology Transfer. Dominic worked primarily with Kevin Lei and EmTech Bio. His interest in incubating startup technology companies began while he was Business Development Manager at Double Fusion, a technology startup that received $35 million in funding from Accel Partners, Norwest, and Jerusalem Venture Partners. Prior to Double Fusion, Dominic worked in digital media at Hollywood talent agency UTA. Prior to UTA, he was an investment banking analyst at Wells Fargo. Dominic received his bachelor's of business administration from Emory University and received his masters of business administration. Upon graduation, Dominic is working at Credit Suisse in Private Banking.

Robert Esterberg
Robert was an intern as well as a postdoctoral fellow in the Biology Department of Emory University. His current research focuses on the generation and maintenance of stem cell pools in vivo through the integration of signaling inputs from different family members. He earned his doctorate in genetics and molecular biology from Emory, where he studied signaling cascades underlying the formation of cranial sensory organs. He is currently studying to take the PTO exam.

Dana Fallaize
Dana is currently an intern and a graduate student in the Microbiology and Molecular Genetics program at Emory University. Her research is being performed in the laboratory of Lian Li, PhD in the Department of Pharmacology. Dana's doctoral research focuses on understanding the mechanisms by which ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction results in neurodegenerative disease. Specifically, Dana is interested in how loss of Mahogunin RING finger 1 (Mgrn1) results in spongiform neurodegeneration. Dana received her bachelor of science in molecular biology from Colgate University in Hamilton, NY.

Rose Santangelo-Freel
Rose was an intern in the office while completing her doctoral degree in the Department of Chemistry under the advisement of Dennis Liotta, PhD. The focus of her research was the design and synthesis of novel subunit-selective modulators of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in collaboration with Stephen Traynelis, PhDin the Department of Pharmacology. These compounds have a range of potential therapeutic applications including Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, schizophrenia, and neuropathic pain. Some of her work has been published in Nature Communications as well as Bioorganic Medicinal Chemistry. Rose received a bachelor of science in chemistry from Juniata College in Huntingdon, PA. After completing her doctoral studies, Rose did a fellowship in the Technology Transfer Center at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, MD.

James Galloway
James was an intern in the office and recently spent a year, training as a preliminary surgical resident, at Emory. The focus of his research is a medical device he co-invented, which is designed for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Over the last year his attention has been centered on the improvement and testing of a functioning prototype, with both animal and cadaver tissues. He has a medical degree from St. Matthew's University, Grand Cayman, British West Indies and a master of health administration from St. Joseph's College, Standish, ME. James began at Emory as an undergraduate, where he earned a bachelor of chemistry.

Kanika Ghai
Kanika was an intern in the office and a postdoctoral fellow at the Emory Eye Center where she conducts circadian biology research. She received her post doctorate in neuroscience from The Ohio State University and a masters in life sciences from St. Xavier's College, Mumbai, India. Her doctoral work focused on studying specific cells in the human eye, the Müller glia, which possess the inherent capacity to behave like stem cells when the retina is injured. She has several publications, including one on the role of the Notch Signaling Pathway in Müller glial cells published in The Journal of Neuroscience. Kanika's interests lie in intellectual property research as well as entrepreneurship within the biotechnology industry.

David Giannantonio
David was an intern while working on his juris doctor degree at Emory's School of Law, and is a registered patent agent with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. He previously attended the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he received a bachelor of science and a master of science in biology. David's research as a graduate student focused on the formation of bacterial and fungal biofilms on outdoor concrete surfaces, and has been published in International Biodeterioration and Biodegradation.

Chalonda R. Handy
Chalonda, a Mississippi native, completed a one year internship in the office while a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Neurosurgery at Emory. During her tenure in office she also began consulting with a number of groups and successfully wrote SBIR/STTR grants that were funded by the NIH. Chalonda holds a doctorate in integrated biomedical science with a minor in neuroscience from The Ohio State University (OSU). She has published in several peer reviewed journals including PNAS, Molecular Therapy and Science Translational Medicine. After leaving Emory, Chalonda moved back to Ohio and functioned in a junior licensing capacity at OSU, just prior to accepting her current licensing associate position at Nationwide Children's Hospital (NCH). Chalonda also works with a number of business development firms in the central Ohio area including Bad Girl Ventures where she serves on the selection committee. Chalonda was named a Howard Bremer scholar in 2013 by the Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) where she is also active with the communications/website committee.

Hasan A. Irier
Hasan A. Irier was an intern in the office and a postdoctoral research fellow in the Human Genetics Department at Emory. Hasan obtained his doctorate from the Pharmacology Department at Emory where he studied translational regulation of a member of ionotropic glutamate receptors family (GluR2) as potential drug targets in epilepsy. The focus of his current research is to identify genome-wide epigenetic signatures unique to learning and memory deficits during aging and associated disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease. As a part of his NIH-funded training program in translational research, Hasan has participated in clinical rotations at Emory's Genetics Clinic meeting patients; followed genetic tests conducted in the clinical laboratories and observed subsequent diagnosis procedures. Hasan’s career interests are in identifying discoveries made in basic science laboratories that have potential uses in clinical settings and public sector.

Meagan Jenkins
Meagan was an intern in the office and is also a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Pharmacology at Emory. Meagan is continuing work she began as a post-doctural student at Emory with Stephen Traynelis, PhD studying ion channel structure and function. Specifically, she has spent the past several years studying how protein kinases enhance the activity of AMPA receptors in the brain, a phenomenon that is critical during learning. Meagan received her bachelor's degree from Smith College in Northampton, MA where she studied neuroscience and chemistry and did research on regulation of mammalian circadian rhythms. Her graduate work has been published in The Journal of Neuroscience and Nature Neuroscience.

Jeff Klenc
Jeff is currently serving as an intern with the Emory Patent Group while conducting postdoctoral work in the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences at Emory School of Medicine. His postdoctoral work under the guidance of Andrew Taylor, MDfocuses on the development of renal radiotracers through medicinal chemistry. He has also recently received the Mitzi & William Blahd, MD, Pilot Research Grant to design, synthesize, and evaluate radiotracers which target a key receptor for the diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy.  In his current work, he relies on his doctoral training at Georgia State University as a synthetic/medicinal chemist where he designed and synthesized neuroreceptor ligands. After completing the internship, Jeff plans to continue his research while pursuing a career in intellectual property protection.

Malini Krishnamoorthy
Malini was an intern while working on her MBA at Emory's Goizueta Business School. She also works as a lead research specialist in Emory's Biomarker Service Center. Her work focuses on the application of high-throughput genetic and molecular techniques for disease research in a translational setting. Malini holds a bachelor of science in industrial biotechnology from Anna University and an master of science in microbiology from The University of Georgia. Her prior work experiences include research on self renewal pathways of human embryonic stem cells and using these cells as a diagnostic model for disease research.

Daniel Kueh
Daniel is an intern and works as a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Biology at Emory. He received a postdoctoral in biological sciences from Western Michigan University where he studied the ability of individual heart neurons in medicinal leeches to selectively target the release of a distinct signaling molecule to specific areas of the animal’s heart tubes. His findings appeared to challenge the prevailing principle that individual neurons release the same signaling molecules at all of their targets areas. Building on his research interests in neural networks, Daniel currently studies the heartbeat central pattern generator in medicinal leeches with the goal of identifying the cells that alter the rhythmic activity of this neural network. His long-term research goal is to help advance current understanding of this neural network so that other investigators can use this system to address interesting questions on how neuromodulation of central pattern generators can alter rhythmic behaviors.

Ranjna Madan-Lala
Ranjna Madan-Lala was an intern in the office and a post doctoral fellow at the Emory Vaccine Center. Ranjna obtained her doctorate from the Indian Institute of Science, India, where she studied the expression and functional significance of the bgl operon of Escherichia coli in the stationary phase of growth. As a post-doctoral fellow at Emory, Ranjna is addressing several fundamental questions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis and its interaction with the host. Her research focuses on understanding the modulation of host immunity by Mtb, and defining Mtb genes that promote its survival in the host. Her work has been published in Journal of Bacteriology, and Infection and Immunity.

Lisa Matragrano
Lisa was an intern in the office and a graduate student in the Neuroscience department at Emory. Her doctoral work focuses on the effects of hormones on the auditory system in songbirds. Lisa received bachelor's degrees in biology and marine science at the University of Miami in FL, where she worked to develop a screening technique for harmful pathogens in water and sand samples. Her other prior experience include researching cognition in bottlenose dolphins and sequencing and localizing an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-like receptor in Aplysia. Lisa joined the Emory Office of Technology Transfer as an marketing associate after graduating from Emory.

Cliff Michaels
Cliff was an intern while completing his graduate degree at Emory. He was instrumental in helping the office develop our technology assessment program and current training material for our intern program. He is active in the local biotechnology community serving as the Dinner Series Coordinator for Georgia BIO's Emerging Leaders Network, and is a member and volunteer with the Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM). Cliff received his doctorate in neuroscience in 2007, with his research focusing on the impact of early-life stress on endogenous opioid systems and behavioral measures of reward. He also holds a bachelor of science degree in neuroscience from Lafayette College in Easton, PA. Cliff joined the office as an intellectual property associate after graduating from Emory, and is currently a licensing associate with the office.

Jeremiah Mitzelfelt
Jeremiah is currently an intern in the office and a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Physiology at Emory University researching the function and interactions of ion channels in epithelial cells. Prior to working at Emory, Jeremiah received his post doctorate in biomedical science from the University of Florida, where he studied the interactions between chronic pain, opioids, and aging. He also earned a bachelor’s degree in honors in neuroscience from Regis University, CO where he helped develop a perceptual taste profile for the umami basic taste. His work has been published in Neuroscience and Journal of Gerontology among others.

Billie A. Moore
Billie was an intern after completing a postdoctoral fellowship at Emory. She has a doctorate in molecular medicine from the Medical College of Georgia, an masters of art in biochemistry from the University of South Dakota and nine published manuscripts. Here graduate thesis work focused on: 1) the growth promoting properties of UV in a melanoma cell line, specifically focusing on the induction of the transferrin receptor promoter; and 2) the role of sonic hedgehog in pharyngeal development and organogenesis of the parathyroid and thymus. Her postdoctoral work involved: 1) the identification of developmental paradigms in order to develop strategies to push stem cells to a pancreatic fate; and 2) the identification of unknown, chemically induced mutations and the characterization of developmental phenotypes in mutant mice.

Cara Mosley
Cara was an intern while concurrently completing her doctoral degree in Emory's Department of Chemistry under Dennis Liotta, PhD. Her research focused on the design and synthesis of novel subunit-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor modulators in collaboration with Stephen Traynelis, PhD of Emory University's School of Medicine. These compounds have a range of possible therapeutic uses including ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and neuropathic pain. Cara obtained a bachelor of science in chemistry from Georgia Institute of Technology. After completing her doctoral studies, she joined Pabst Patent Group LLP as a Scientific Advisor.

Sharon K. Ngwenya
Sharon was an intern in the office as well as a postdoctoral fellow in the Fellowship in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) program. Her current research in the Division of Digestive Diseases is on the effect of the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), on the gene expression of KLF5 in intestinal epithelial cells. Sharon earned her doctorate from Texas A&M University in a multidisciplinary program with the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics and the Toxicology Program of the Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology. The title of her doctoral dissertation is "Regulation of E2F-1 Gene Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cells." She graduated with a bachelor in science in biochemistry from Oakwood College, in Huntsville, AL. After completing her postdoctoral studies at Emory, Sharon joined intellectual property practice of the law firm Ballard & Spahr as a technology specialist. Sharon later transitioned into technology transfer as a licensing associate at The University of Tennessee Research Foundation in Knoxville, TN. Currently, she is a senior licensing associate at The Methodist Hospital Research Institute in Houston, TX.

Michael Nullet
Michael was an intern in the office and in his second year at the Emory's School of Law. His studies are focused on patent law and internet law. After law school, he hopes to specialize in patents and commercialization strategies for new intellectual property. Prior to law school, Michael worked as a project manager at Prometheus Research, and managed the development of custom online databases for autism research. He earned his bachelor's in biochemistry and chemistry at Cornell University, NY.

Yvonne Ogbonmwan
Yvonne is an intern and a graduate student in the Neuroscience Graduate Program. Her doctoral research is conducted in the laboratory of David Weinshenker, PhD in the Department of Human Genetics. She is currently studying how chronic voluntary exercise reduces the incidence of relapse in individuals with a history of substance abuse. Specifically, she is studying how the therapeutic effects of exercise are mediated by the interaction of the norepinephrine neurotransmitter system and the galanin system in the brain. Yvonne received her bachelor degree in biology from Georgia State University.

Lola Olufemi
Lola is a licensing intern and a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Biochemistry at Emory. Initially serving as an intern to the Emory Patent Group, Lola chose to take advantage of the opportunity and also learn the licensing and marketing aspect of technology transfer. She completed her doctoral research at Southern Illinois University in the area of molecular biology, biochemistry, and microbiology. Her research focused on examining the domain architecture and function of the ISWI family of chromatin remodeling complexes. During her graduate studies, Lola was a contributing writer for ASBMB Today, a monthly publication of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Prior to her graduate school, Lola worked as a consultant to both Amgen and Dentsply Pharmaceuticals. Lola plans to collectively draw from these experiences, and pursue a career in patent law.

Sameshnee Pelly
Sameshnee Pelly was an intern in our offices and holds a doctorate in the field of synthetic organic chemistry from the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa. Her research focused on novel methods for the synthesis of 1,3-disubstituted pyranonaphthoquinones, a structural class of compounds which possess antibiotic as well as anti-cancer properties. Her work culminated in the first total synthesis of the naturally occurring quinone, cardinalin 3. She is currently working towards her law degree at the University of South Africa.

Cornel Phillip
Cornel was an intern in the office and a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. As a post-doctoral fellow, his work focused on designing and identifying therapeutic strategies and targets for prostate cancer as well as understanding disease progression. In addition, he completed his doctoral work in cancer biology/pharmacology from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. As a graduate student, he identified possible therapeutic agents and targets for multiple myeloma using a transcription inhibitor, small molecule inhibitor, and shRNA. He has peer reviewed publications in Cancer Research and Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology. Cornel is currently a medical writer at Articulate Science in Atlanta, GA.

John V.K. Pulliam
John was an intern and a postdoctoral fellow in the Fellowship in Research and Science Teaching program (FIRST) program in the Department of Physiology at Emory and Department of Neurobiology at Morehouse School of Medicine. His former research involved the investigation of transcription factors which may be neuroprotective targets for stroke and other forms of brain injury. John also completed a postdoctoral appointment in Center for Cancer Research and Therapeutic Development at Clark Atlanta University (CAU). At CAU John investigated the genetic regulation of a androgen independence in the development of prostate cancer. John earned his doctorate in neuroscience from Emory. For his doctoral dissertation John investigated a role for cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript peptide in social stress induced anxiety-like behavior. Prior to his graduate education, John received his bachelors degree in Molecular Cell Biology (Neurobiology) from the University of California at Berkeley. Johns interests lie in the commercialization and business development of biotechnology. Following his postdoctoral research appointments, John joined the Marketing group as a Marketing Application Scientist at the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) in Manassas, Virginia. John role is to serve as a technical service liaison for scientists while assisting in the promotion and development of current and new products of the American Type Cell Systems and Cell Biology product lines.

Adam Raymond
Adam was an intern while completing his doctoral degree in biochemistry, cell, and developmental Biology in the Department of Cell Biology at Emory. His research was focused on the molecular and physiological aspects underlying male fertility and included investigating mechanisms important for sperm maturation and the integrity of the male reproductive tract. Prior to joining the doctoral program, Adam earned a bachelor of science in Biological Sciences from the University of Notre Dame, IN, and worked as a Research Specialist at Emory's Department of Biochemistry, identifying host factors that affect integration of the yeast retrotransposon Ty1. After completing his doctoral studies, Adam joined Pabst Patent Group, LLP, as a Scientific Advisor in the areas of biotechnology and pharmaceuticals. Adam drafts patent applications, invalidity, freedom to operate and non-infringement opinion letters, prosecutes U. S. patent applications (drafts responses, amendments, and appeal and reply briefs), and corresponds with foreign associates to guide the prosecution of foreign applications. Adam is registered U.S. Patent Agent.

Patrick Reynolds
Patrick was an intern in the office and a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Pharmacology at Emory. His research focused on examining the combinatorial role of genetic mutations and environmental or drug-based insults in the progression of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's Disease. He received his post doctoral from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he studied the role of specific Roc-Cullin interactions in E3 Ubiquitin Ligases. This research led to publication in Molecular Biology of the Cell and PLoS One. Patrick's interests lie in the areas of technology commercialization and business development. Patrick is currently a licensing associate at the University of Tennessee Research Foundation, where his portfolio is focused on life science and medical technologies.

S. Anna Sargsyan
Anna was an intern in the office and a postdoctoral fellow in Emory's Department of Ophthalmology. Anna is currently working on characterizing the influence of light and dark adaptation on neuronal cell coupling in the retina. Prior to joining Emory, Anna obtained her doctoral degree from University of Sheffield, UK, and received postdoctoral training at University of Colorado Denver. Her diverse background involves research in the involvement of the glial cells in the pathogenesis of an orphan neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a study on the role of Epstein Barr virus in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, and detection of complement activation in the kidney with non-invasive methods, such as magnetic resonance imaging.

Anjali Shah
Anjali was an intern in the office while pursuing her doctoral studies in genetics and molecular biology at Emory. The focus of her research is on neurodegenerative diseases, more specifically, the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis involved in the polyglutamine disease, Spinocerebellar Ataxia 17. Before matriculating, Anjali worked as a research specialist at a small start-up biotechnology company specializing in the development of novel therapeutics to treat staphylococcal infections. She holds a master of science in biotechnology from Johns Hopkins University, MD and a bachelor of science in molecular biology from Vanderbilt University, TN.

David Shore
David was a post-doctoral service fellow with the influenza division at Center's for Disease Control (CDC). His research focuses on the structural basis for antigen recognition and contributes towards the development of novel strategies for influenza vaccines. Prior to working with CDC David worked as a post-doctoral fellow in the field of structural biology at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, CA. David received his doctoral in philosophy in biochemistry from the University of Oxford, UK and his bachelors degree in medical microbiology at University College London, UK, David's career interests lie in the development of scientific products from the bench to the marketplace.

Monica Fernandez-Sierra
Monica is a biophysical chemist currently working as a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Physics at Emory, where her research focuses on understanding the modulation of DNA topology by enzymes such as the type-II topoisomerases. Monica received her doctoral degree in chemistry from the University of Puerto Rico, where she studied DNA mechanics and enzymatic reactions using fluorescence spectroscopy and single-molecule microscopy. As a result of her doctoral research, she established a single-molecule method to measure the torque stored in supercoiled DNA molecules and developed fluorescence-based assays to monitor the kinetics of exonucleases and restriction enzymes in real time. Upon completing the internship at the Emory OTT, she plans to pursue a career in intellectual property.

Sharon Soucek
Sharon is an intern and a graduate student in the Department of Biochemistry under the supervision of Anita Corbett, PhD. Her research seeks to elucidate how gene expression is regulated by RNA binding proteins. Sharon is characterizing the poly(A) RNA binding protein, ZC3H14, by identifying its target mRNAs and its role in post-transcriptional RNA processing events in order to understand why mutations in ZC3H14 lead to intellectual disability. Prior to starting doctoral research at Emory, Sharon received her bachelor of science in biology from Northeastern University.

Aaron Thornton
Aaron was an intern in the office while finishing his doctorate in the organic division of the chemistry department at Emory. His graduate work focused on the development of new methods for the synthesis nitrogen-containing molecules using highly reactive metallonitrenes. Aaron's graduate research was published in multiple peer-reviewed journals and he has received multiple awards for this work. Aaron received his bachelors of arts with honors in chemistry from Knox College in Galesburg, IL. Aaron is currently working as a Global Marketing Manager for BASF Corporation in Iselin, NJ.

Sylvia Hsu-Chen Yip
Sylvia was an intern and postdoctoral fellow at Department of Biochemistry, Emory University. She holds a bachelors in biochemistry from National University of Malaysia and a doctoral degree in chemistry from the Australian National University. Sylvia's doctoral and postdoctoral research focused on protein engineering and the understanding of how proteins evolve secondary activities. Her work has been published in Journal of American Chemical Society, Protein Engineering Design and Selection and Inorganic Chemistry etc. After completing her postdoctoral training and OTT internship, Sylvia accepted a position as a patent agent in the boutique intellectual property law firm Alchemy-Partners PC in Northern Virginia. Outside her profession, Sylvia serves in the national committee of the non-profit organization Women in Bio and writes for the Scientific Malaysian magazine. Sylvia speaks 6 languages fluently.

Huanyu Zhao
Huanyu was an intern in the office as well as a postdoctoral fellow at the Emory Institute for Drug Discovery (EIDD). Her research interests lie in the discovery of novel antagonists of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR-4), which is a co-receptor for the entry of HIV into host cells and hence a potential target for the treatment of AIDS. In addition, since the receptor is involved in hematopoietic stem cell mobilization, these compounds could also be used as immunostimulant. She received her post doctoral degree from Columbia University, NY, where she showed that exquisitely-modified polymers can be used as artificial enzymes to catalyze organic reactions in aqueous media with dramatically-improved robustness under extreme conditions.

Sommer Zimmerman
Sommer was an intern in the office while working as a graduate student in the Department of Chemistry at Emory under the advisement of Dennis Liotta, PhD. Her research, performed in collaboration with Stephen Traynelis, PhD in the Department of Pharmacology, focuses on the design and synthesis of novel, subunit-selective potentiators of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function. Sommer obtained a bachelor of science in chemistry in 2006 and psychology, with a double major in criminology, in 2004 from Florida State University. Sommer recently joined the law firm of Ballard Spahr LLP as a part-time technical specialist while continuing to complete her doctoral degree.